Top travel locations to visit in Croatia and Slovenia and the local weather

Top travel locations to visit in Slovenia and Croatia and the local weather? Widely regarded as one of the top tourist destinations on Croatia’s spectacular Dalmatian coast, the attractive seaside town of Trogir is a delightful vacation destination to explore. With a rich history that dates all the way back to its founding in 380 BC, Trogir has at various times been ruled by the Greeks, Romans, Hungarians, and Venetians. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site-an honor bestowed on the town in 1997-Trogir offers tourists no end of fun things to do. In addition to its many top-rated hotels and accommodation options, visitors are spoiled for choice when seeking a good seafood restaurant, or getting in some souvenir shopping. Thanks to the careful preservation of its many old buildings, history buffs and sightseers alike have plenty of attractions to visit, most of them to be found within the confines of the town walls dating back to the 1400s.

Lipica Stud Farm has been breeding Lipizzaner horses since the sixteenth century. Once used by royals for their private stables, the farm is now open to visitors and allows them to admire this beautiful breed of horse. When visiting the Lipica Stud Farm, guests can stroll through the barns and join one of the farm’s guided tours. Three times a week the Classical Riding School performs, and guests can see the Lipizzaner horses in action.

The amphitheater in Pula is the sixth largest surviving Roman arena and one of the best preserved Roman monuments in Croatia. The Pula Arena was built around the 1st century AD and could seat over 26,000 spectators. In the 15th century many stones were taken from the amphitheater to build houses and other structures around Pula, but fortunately this practice was stopped before the whole structure was destroyed. Today it is a popular Croatia attraction and used to host a variety of festivals and performances during the summer months.

Now, this is a gem – one of the best Croatia destinations that a tourist can select. The question is, ‘what’s so special about this national park?’. This national park has been listed since 1979 as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is a place where 16 crystalline lakes form a surreal atmosphere. All these lakes are connected with each other with waterfalls. It is not a free place to roam around and requires visitors to buy a ticket. The best way to wander around the park is on foot, and it will take approximately 6 hours or so. But it is worth the time spent. With more than 120 bird species and resident wolves and bears, this national park never fails to woo the travelers who travel to Croatia. Just one thing to remember – swimming isn’t allowed in any of the lakes. Also, those who want to explore via buses and boats, they are most welcome to do so with free services provided by the park. See more information at Koper vreme.

On the 18th August each year, a pirate battle (well, a re-enactment of a 13th century one!) takes place off the coast of Omis. Thousands of people are drawn to witness this special event! Makarska is not a clubbing capital, but as the largest settlement between Split and Dubrovnik, it has more options than most. Young people from neighbouring villages often beeline here on weekend nights. Peter Pan is popular with locals, but the Balkan turbo-folk music might begin to grate. The best option is Deep Makarska, situated inside a cave. They take full advantage of the setting, illuminating the cave with atmospheric lighting. It also offers a splendid view.

Encompassing 142 square km along the Krka River, the Krka National Park is best known for being home to a number of stunning waterfalls. The most popular of these are the Skradinski Buk falls, which are one of the most famous sights in the entire country. However, the park is home to plenty of other worthwhile sights as well, including secluded monasteries, diverse wildlife, and the 200-meter-deep karstic canyon through which the river runs. The park can be accessed by car through any of the five main entrances, which are found at Skradin, Lozovac, Roški Slap, the Krka Monastery, and Burnum. Find even more information on here.

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